save the bay 2005 poster
SAVE THE BAY 2005
RECENTLY THE QLD STATE GOVERNMENT ANOUNCED THAT THEY WERE IN FAVOUR OF AT LEAST 60 MILLION TONNES OF SAND BEING MINED FROM THE MORETON BAY MARINE PARK

20 Million tonnes are for the airport
20 Million Tonnes for a deeper shipping channel and port expansion
20 Million tonnes for the construction industry The governments report can be found at
Summary of Findings - Moreton Bay Sand Study  www.epa.qld.gov.au/publications/p01580aa.pdf/

BREC opposes this massive expansion of mining in Moreton Bay
What will happen next with the proposed Sand Mining in Moreton Bay?
Each new application will be submitted separately that is 3-4 commercial applications, one from the airport, one from the port. The EPA has to issue environmental licences, under the Environmental Protection Act, and permit the use in the marine park under the Marine Parks act. The DSD would probably coordinate the application process. There is the possibility they may have to get approvals under the Cultural Heritage Act from DNRM. Each application will probably trigger the Federal EPBC Act.
Community Campaign Objectives

1. Change government policy and the Moreton Bay Marine Park Zoning Plan so that extractive industries are not allowed in marine parks. Get the government to expand the conservation areas of the Moreton Bay Marine Park.

2. Change Government policy so that the pricing of sand resources include the full costs of extraction, monitoring and rehabilitation.

3. Change Government Policy so that new approvals are conditional on industry funding of demand reduction measures.

4. Ensure that community groups are fully involved in the setting the terms of reference for any EIS and the preparation of any EIS. If approvals are given ensure that community groups are involved in setting conditions and monitoring ongoing operations. Approvals should contain clauses that allow for the temporary or permanent cessation of activities if breaches occur.

5. Ensure that the areas Traditional Owners are fully involved at all stages of the process in a fair and equitable way and that their cultural heritage and other rights are protected.


NEXT STEPS Letters to State and Federal politicians, the Premier, Minister State Development, Environment Minister and Natural Resource Minister are encouraged. Comments to talk back radio are also welcome.
Counterspin regarding Government justification for increasing mining in Moreton Bay

Govt: "Sand Mining on land is bad"
Response: We will still see more sand mines on land with more damage occuring assisted by the Governments Extractives SPP
Govt: "This will result in 7000 less trucks"
Response The amount of truck movements for extractive industries will still increase compared to present levels
Govt: "This can be done with no impact"
Response The last extraction from the bay for the airport reduced fish stocks for at least five years.
The increased depth of the shipping channel has to affect Bribie Island
The shipping channel could also cause sand to fall from the northern banks into the new deeper channel
The current dredging does have local and subregional impacts.
Govt: "This sand is needed for growth"
Response The need for this mining is based on projections that not only will we have more people that we also use more sand per person every year.
The government and industry have rejected repeated calls by environmentalists, recreational fishing groups, commercial fishing groups and Traditional owners for them to promote demand reduction through more efficient use, recycling and proper pricing.
Govt: "dredging only to a depth 10m will protect the Traditional Owners cultural values"
The cultural significance of the Northern Moreton bay will not be protected by limiting mining to 10m in depth. The whole area is a landscape of very high cultural significance.
Govt: "The areas to mined have low conservation values"
Response The areas support a rich array of fish, crabs, squids, sharks, sailfish and many other species.

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